Latin has a phrase for “exactly as written”: literally ac litteratim, which literally means “word for word and letter for letter”. Like the literal word in this Latin expression, English literally means “word by word.” As you may have noticed, there is literally a verb – and this is no coincidence. The verb and letter derive from the Latin word for “word,” which is pure. Other common English words that share this root are adverb, proverb and detailed. Even the word itself is related. It may also be literal an adjective that means “in or according to the exact words” (as in “a literal report”) and a rarer noun that refers to a report, translation, or report that follows the original word by word. She had seen the film so often that she could literally quote it with the characters. These examples are automatically chosen from different online message sources to reflect the common use of the word “literally.” The opinions expressed in the examples do not give the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its publishers. Send us feedback. Also known as cat author, CAT author, judicial journalist, st-sttr, palantypist, a journalist is someone who records, by stenographic means, every word spoken in proceedings of which a recording is recorded. Trials, arbitration and public inquiries, disciplinary hearings and U.S. statements are examples. We should not be confused with a newspaper journalist/journalist.

She did this by literally repeating to me, as much as possible, what she was hearing and showing me how to join the conversation. At the same time, he does not quote the chronicler Marcellinus, whose story of Augustulus` impeachment he literally copied. Literally, it`s word for word. If you repeat something to the letter, say it with exactly the same words in the same order as the original testimony. If you repeat something to the letter, the full meaning of the original statement must be preserved. “Literally” can also mean “as pronounced” in some official treaties. Such contracts do not allow the processing of consultation minutes. The term “publishing” is used at the risk of drawing the ure of those who claim that it is not at all up to the word reporters to edit and that it is their duty to record and transcribe always and inexorably the words of a spokesperson exactly as they were said. . . .

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